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International Litigation & Arbitration: May 2013 Archives

Mass. Gen. Law Chapter 93A -- One Benefit of Litigating in Massachusetts

As a foreign attorney representing a party whose business dispute is governed by Massachusetts law, you might want to learn about the rights available under the consumer protection statute in Massachusetts, M.G.L. c. 93A.  Massachusetts General Laws c. 93A, § 2 (a) makes unlawful any "[u]nfair or deceptive acts or practices in the conduct of any trade or commerce."  This prohibition is "extended to those engaged in trade or commerce in business transactions with others similarly engaged" by M.G.L. c. 93A, § 11. 

Emergency Relief in International Arbitration

Before running off to Court to file an emergency request for a temporary restraining order or a preliminary injunction, counsel should consider whether the same relief can and should be sought from an arbitral institution.  Start with review of the agreement at issue and its dispute resolution clause; you may find that it provides a preferable alternative to Court.  Effective procedures for emergency interim relief are provided by the rules of leading arbitral institutions of the world, including the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), The London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA), the International Centre for Dispute Resolution of the American Arbitration Association (ICDR) and others.

Challenging an Arbitration Award in Massachusetts

Alternative dispute resolution is rightly gaining steam as an efficient, fair mechanism for the resolution of complex business disputes.  Many companies are redrafting their standard-form contracts to include mandatory arbitration clauses.  This is particularly true for companies doing business across state or national borders, so that they might avoid being hauled into court in a foreign jurisdiction.  But what if you agree to arbitrate a dispute and end up losing?  Do you have any recourse? 

Fighting for Silver: The Legal Consequences of Nationalization in Bolivia

Seven years ago this week, one of the most significant chapters in Bolivian history began. With one stroke of the pen on May 1, 2006, then-newly-elected president Evo Morales issued a decree nationalizing all of Bolivia's oil and gas reserves. This was shortly followed by efforts to nationalize many other natural resources in the country, including precious minerals and other elements. The nationalization of many industries has had significant legal consequences, most of which are still felt today.

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